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Imagining Russian Jewry Memory, History, Identity (Samuel and Althea Stroum Lectures in Jewish Studies) by Steven J. Zipperstein

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Published by University of Washington Press .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Jewish studies,
  • Historiography,
  • History Of Jews,
  • History,
  • History - General History,
  • History: World,
  • Russia,
  • Europe - Russia & the Former Soviet Union,
  • Jewish - General,
  • Jews,
  • Memory,
  • Public opinion

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages139
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL9561657M
ISBN 100295977892
ISBN 109780295977898

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  Drawing on a wide range of sources—including novels, plays, and archival material—Imagining Russian Jewry is a reflection on reading, collective memory, and the often uneasy, and also uncomfortably intimate, relationships that exist between seemingly incompatible ways of seeing the past. The book also explores what it means to produce scholarship on topics that are deeply Pages: Imagining Russian Jewry Book Description: This subtle, unusual book explores the many, often overlapping ways in which the Russian Jewish past has been . Drawing on a wide range of sources—including novels, plays, and archival material— Imagining Russian Jewry is a reflection on reading, collective memory, and the often uneasy, and also uncomfortably intimate, relationships that exist between seemingly incompatible ways of seeing the past. The book also explores what it means to produce scholarship on topics that are deeply personal: its . Drawing on a wide range of sources - including novels, plays, and archival material - Imagining Russian Jews is a reflection on reading, collective memory and the often uneasy, and also uncomfortably intimate, relationships that exist between seemingly incompatible ways of seeing the past."--Jacket.

  ZIPPERSTEIN, IMAGINING RUSSIAN JEWRY--KOBRIN mation took place because ``the Holocaust [had] rendered Eastern Europe more conducive to sentimentalization'' and the disjuncture of suburbanization nurtured in American Jewry a desire to imagine ``a direct, even linear relationship between the East European shtetl and the American suburb'' (pp. 32, 30).   Drawing on a wide range of sources—including novels, plays, and archival material—Imagining Russian Jewry is a reflection on reading, collective memory, and the often uneasy, and also uncomfortably intimate, relationships that exist between seemingly incompatible ways of seeing the past. The book also explores what it means to produce scholarship on topics that are deeply Author: Steven J. Zipperstein. Imagining Stalin's Plot to Exile the Jews. By Ken The report launched a vicious anti-Semitic media campaign that played on long-standing Russian fears and hatreds. One of the book’s Author: Ken Kalfus. The Complete Black Book of Russian Jewryis a collection of eyewitness testimonies, letters, diaries, affidavits, and other documents on the activities of the Nazis against Jews in the camps, ghettoes, and towns of Eastern ly, the only apt comparism is to The Gulag Archipelago of Alexander definitive edition of The Black Book, including for the first time /5(6).

The Black Book of Soviet Jewry or simply The Black Book (Russian: чёрная книга, Chiornaya Kniga; Yiddish: דאָס שוואַרצע בוך‎, Dos shvartse bukh), also known as The Complete Black Book of Russian Jewry, is a page book compiled for publication by Ilya Ehrenburg and Vasily Grossman originally in late in the Russian language. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Imagining Russian Jewry: Memory, History, Identity (Samuel and Althea Stroum Lectures in Jewish Studies) at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users/5. The Complete Black Book of Russian Jewry is a collection of eyewitness testimonies, letters, diaries, affidavits, and other documents on the activities of the Nazis against Jews in the camps, ghettoes, and towns of Eastern Europe. Arguably, the only apt comparison is /5(K). Russian Jewry by Frumkin, J. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at